MEET THE ARTIST: Andy Walker, (by Oliver Norris)

All my work is informed by my own photography, the starting point for the creation of work that enhances, reinterprets and intensifies the piece to the point of a vibrant photorealism. Capturing landscapes, with all their details, depth and subtleties, as well highlighting the nuances and effects of the prevailing light, is my driving force. My personally-developed and unique technique involves drawing, by hand, up to tens of thousands of triangles, each individually shaped, placed and coloured, until the effect I wish to reach is obtained. This is actioned with the use of a stylus and electronic tablet. As two dimensional digital art, it follows that all work is printed, but is only issued as limited edition, archival quality giclée prints, using the highest quality, non-fade, natural pigments to ensure clarity and accurate colour.

Tickets to Sussex Art Fairs (East) 11-13 October 2019 are available HERE and also on EVENTBRITE

What is your background and where are you from?

Originally from Wotton-under-Edge, I still live and work in the Cotswolds. I studied Illustration and Photography at nearby Stroud Art College.

How do you classify your work and how is it created?

Fascinated by colour, geometric shapes and tonal effects, I have developed my technique, inspired by my own photography, using intensely coloured triangles. My art includes landscapes that initially appear realistic but, upon closer study, reveal thousands of triangles and are almost abstract. Every work (and triangle) is individually hand-drawn and coloured using a tablet and stylus. A detailed landscape takes at at least four weeks to complete.

Where’s your studio, what’s it like and do you have any rituals?

I work at home in a converted 18th Century Mill in a hidden valley near Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire. Also I have no ‘ritual’ as such, I always have to listen to music when working.

What challenges have you faced in the art world?

Explaining my work; how it is created and that despite being ‘digital’ it is all hand-drawn!

What is the main message of your work, what does it aim to say?

I aim to draw the viewer into beautiful landscapes, enhancing my photographic studies to maximise depth, texture, colour and vitality.

Is there a common reaction to your work?

Usually an attraction to the piece and then surprise that close-up, it’s wildly abstract, often followed by viewing closer and further away repeatedly!

What are your inspirations and influences?

Having grown up in the beautiful Cotswold countryside, I’m drawn to natural scenes as well as landscapes featuring water, whether sea, lakes or rivers.

Who would you say are your favourite contemporary artists?

There are so many, but certainly David Hockney (see his iPad works!), Bridget Riley and Jon Burgerman.

How have you developed since you first started exhibiting your work?

My earlier pieces were more a study in colours and form, but have since developed in adding more intensity and detail. This can be seen by the steady increase in the number of triangles that form each artwork.

What do you have planned for Sussex Art Fairs in October?

I will be exhibiting a wide variety of Landscapes and Seascapes, including local Sussex scenes as well as other UK and Italian views.

What are your plans for 2020 and beyond?

As well as a full programme of Art Exhibitions and Fairs in the UK, I will be taking part in events across Europe and the USA, happily giving me more subjects for future pieces.

Tickets to Sussex Art Fairs (East) 11-13 October 2019 are available HERE and also on EVENTBRITE